Quick Answer: What Does Wee Stoater Mean?

What does get it up ye mean?

Weegie phrase: get it right up ye/ get it right roon ye.

Translation: a phrase often used in a smug way to describe a victory or as a way of making a valid point..

What does yer bum’s oot the Windae mean?

You’re talking absolute nonsense“Yer bum’s oot the windae”. Translation: “You’re talking absolute nonsense”.

What is crack in Scottish?

Craic (/kræk/ KRAK) or crack is a term for news, gossip, fun, entertainment, and enjoyable conversation, particularly prominent in Ireland. … The word has an unusual history; the Scots and English crack was borrowed into Irish as craic in the mid-20th century and the Irish spelling was then reborrowed into English.

What is a wee Stoater?

Noun. stoater (plural stoaters) (informal) (Scotland, Ireland) A beautiful girl or woman.

What does weegie mean?

Weegie, n. and adj.: A native or inhabitant of Glasgow; a Glaswegian. Bam, n.2: A foolish, annoying, or obnoxious person; (also spec.) a belligerent or disruptive person. Often as a contemptuous form of address.

What does Haud yer Wheesht mean?

Shut upHaud yer wheesht! – Shut up. Gie it laldy. – Doing something with energy or inappropriateness.

What does Och Aye noo mean?

Oh yes, just now“Och aye the noo!” This is one of those Scottish phrases that can be heard in countless parodies aimed at poking fun at the Scots’ dialect and accent. Its direct English translation is “Oh yes, just now”.

What does Gonnae no mean?

gonnae no ​Definitions and Synonyms ​phrase. DEFINITIONS1. 1. a Scottish-English term meaning ‘don’t’ – but perhaps more of a request: ‘please don’t’

How do Scots say hello?

Scots is considered a separate language from Scottish English and from the English of England, and is recognised as such by the Scottish and UK governments….Useful Scots phrases.EnglishScots Leid (Scots)Hello (General greeting)HulloHow are you?Whit like? Whit like are ye? Hoo are ye? Hou’r ye? Hoo’s it gaun? How ye daein?53 more rows

Why do Glaswegians say but?

Which brings us to perhaps the most common use of ‘but’ among Glaswegians in being a particle used for interactive reasons simply to show the other person that they can speak.