Who Has The Majority In Northern Ireland?

Which ethnic group is the majority in Northern Ireland?

This statistic shows the ethnic breakdown of Northern Ireland residents on March 29, 2011, the day of the last National Census.

While over 98 percent of the population were white, 0.35 percent were Chinese, and 0.34 percent Indian..

Is a Fenian a Catholic?

The term Fenian today occurs as a derogatory sectarian term in Ireland, referring to Irish nationalists or Catholics, particularly in Northern Ireland.

Do Northern Irish consider themselves Irish?

In Northern Ireland, national identity is complex and diverse. … Most people of Protestant background consider themselves British, while a majority of people of Catholic background consider themselves Irish.

Who is in control of Northern Ireland?

Since 1998, Northern Ireland has had devolved government within the United Kingdom, presided over by the Northern Ireland Assembly and a cross-community government (the Northern Ireland Executive).

Is Northern Ireland liberal or conservative?

Although Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom, it has a quite distinct party system from the rest of the country, as the Labour Party and Liberal Democrats do not contest elections there (though the Liberal Democrats have links with the Alliance Party), and the Conservative Party has received only limited …

Who is the majority in Northern Ireland Catholic or Protestants?

Like Great Britain (but unlike most of the Republic of Ireland), Northern Ireland has a plurality of Protestants (48% of the resident population are either Protestant, or brought up Protestant, while 45% of the resident population are either Catholic, or brought up Catholic, according to the 2011 census) and its people …

Is Belfast mainly Protestant or Catholic?

As you can see, west Belfast is mainly Catholic, in most areas over 90%. For many years, the Catholic population expanded to the southwest, but in recent years it has started expanding around the Shankill and into north Belfast. The east of the city is predominantly Protestant, typically 90% or more.

Is Scotland more Catholic or Protestant?

2.11 When asked about their religious identity in this way, 30% of people in Scotland think of themselves as Protestant and 15% consider themselves to be Catholic. Another 15% think of themselves as Christian, but neither Protestant nor Catholic, while 3% say they are Muslim and 1% identify with another religion.

Is Northern Ireland still dangerous?

Despite this, Northern Ireland remains a relatively safe place for tourists, and there hasn’t been any indication of foreigners or tourist areas being targeted by terrorists. But with the increased attacks in the last two years, tourists are advised to be alert of their surroundings.

What percentage of Northern Ireland is Protestant?

41.6%Northern Ireland/Protestant population

Which party is in power in Northern Ireland?

Sinn Féin, currently the biggest of the nationalist parties in Northern Ireland, has campaigned for a broadening of the franchise of Northern Ireland voters to allow them to vote in elections to choose the President of Ireland.

What is the majority religion in Northern Ireland?

Christianity is the main religion in Northern Ireland. The 2011 UK census showed 40.8% Catholic, 19.1% Presbyterian Church, with the Church of Ireland having 13.7% and the Methodist Church 5.0%.

What percentage of Belfast is Catholic?

The number of Orthodox Christians in Northern Ireland is estimated at about 3000 followers….List of districts in Northern Ireland by religion or religion brought up in.DistrictBelfastCatholic48.8%Protestant and other Christian42.5%Other8.7%10 more columns

Is Armagh Catholic or Protestant?

Armagh was the seat of St. Patrick, and the Catholic Church continues to be his see. County Armagh is presently one of four counties of Northern Ireland to have a majority of the population from a Catholic background, according to the 2011 census.

Is the IRA Protestant or Catholic?

The Troubles (Irish: Na Trioblóidí) was an ethno-nationalist conflict in Northern Ireland during the late 20th century. … It also had an ethnic or sectarian dimension, but despite the use of the terms “Protestant” and “Catholic” to refer to the two sides, it was not a religious conflict.